Clip Producers: How To Do Fetish Research by Katy Churchill

Choosing Fetishes

Using Clips4Sale (And Other Sites) For More Profitable Fetish Clips

Okay, so you’ve chosen a fetish that you’re interested in filming, what do you do now? Before diving into recording content in a brand new niche, take some time to do your research. The more advance prep you do, the better your sales will be. This article outlines my own research process, which I have successfully used to have top clips in several fetish categories on Clips4Sale, as well as top studio ranking in multiple categories.

 

Research Is Better Than Filming Content That Doesn’t Sell

Research can be time consuming, but it is ultimately far more efficient than filming content that doesn’t sell. Over time, this process has become second nature to me, and I keep a Google Doc with a master list of everything I’ve found over the years. Whenever sales slump or I am not feeling inspired, I return to my research notes and build new ideas from the valuable information I’ve kept track of.

 

How I Research Fetishes

Clips4Sale is my primary source of information. I often research my fetish content exclusively on C4S, even when the content will be sold on other clip sites. C4S has been around for years, specializes in fetish content that you may not find on other sites, and its catalog of content is unparalleled. Its design is not the most attractive, true, but it is functional, and the variety of fetishes and content outweighs any user interface shortcomings.

For research purposes, though, I would not recommend using C4S on your phone. Research in general is more of a “sit down in front of the computer” endeavour anyway, but a lot of the functionality I’ll be discussing is not available on mobile.

I’ve included screenshots of my process, in case you aren’t familiar with the site. I’ve used one of my own videos as an example.

 

Choosing Fetishes

 

Steps To Doing Fetish Research On Clips4Sale

Find your category from the drop-down menu. I have categories I frequently film in bookmarked because I visit them often. Yes, I constantly research the fetishes I film in, even those I’ve been doing for years. There is always something I can learn, and even fetishes are susceptible to trends.

 

Study The Top Clips / Top Studios For Each Category

Mouse over the top clips and top studios in the category. Hovering over the links will show you a screenshot from the studio’s most recent upload to the category or the clip in the top 50. I look for images that indicate it might be a video suitable for me to film. For example, if there are multiple people in the image, then I ignore it unless I have upcoming shoots with other models. If you click the link of a suitable image, it will take you directly to the video (in the top clips list) or to all the studio’s videos in that category (top studios).

 

Find Correlating Key Phrases, Scenarios and Other Elements In Top Clips

When looking at individual videos, take note of the “related categories” and “keywords” fields. These can give you ideas for combining fetishes and increasing sales. When researching, don’t just look at one or two of the top videos. Look at as many as are applicable to your particular filming situation. You want to look for key phrases, scenarios, even camera angles (as much as you can judge from GIFs or previews) that are repeated in multiple videos from multiple studios. Finding these commonalities will give you an idea of what is popular in the fetish, and what sells. I then use the list of common features of top videos as the foundation of my own video, fleshing it out with my own ideas, skills, preferences, and scenarios.

 

Use This For Inspiration – Not Blatantly Ripping Ideas Off!

PLEASE NOTE: There is a difference between taking information and inspiration from other people’s content, and copying their work. I do not advocate copying other models or producers work. If you are not clear on the difference between reference/research and plagiarism/infringement, I would not advise you to use the techniques outlined above.

 

Other Places for Fetish Research

FetLife – I used to scroll through FetLife discussion groups and such to round out my filming ideas, but I don’t find them very valuable for several reasons. First of all, the time spent for information collected is way out of ratio. These groups are basically old-school message boards for fetishists, so you have to wade through a lot of generic chatty messages to get to anything of substance.

Secondly, FetLife is aimed at real-life fetish experiences, and the interests and needs of lifestyle fetish folk can be different from the interests of the video-buying crowd.

Finally, you might find people eswapping your videos, the videos of other models, or even trashing your work. I personally don’t enjoy stumbling across that crap when I’m trying to psych myself up to film more awesome content. Everyone is a critic, but I don’t need to hear the opinion of people who often haven’t paid for my work.

 

Pornhub – Tube sites tend to only post more “mainstream” fetishes. They’re sort of a “fetish lite” repository. Their main use is to find and DMCA or claim your own stolen content, but if you are concerned about piracy, you can spend some time figuring out commonly pirated fetishes. I don’t use tube sites to research fetishes because it doesn’t show me what content people are willing to pay for, just what they’re willing to watch for free.

 

Literotica – I’ve heard several models say that they research their work on free written erotica sites, but I personally have never found them useful in the least. Written work is (obviously) different from visual content, and the scenarios are often quite long-form, which does not easily translate to the more dense fetish content required for sellable videos. Additionally, much of the readily available free content gives you a limited idea of the popularity of the fetish scenarios outlined, and I am not convinced that consumers of free written fetish content cross over in any significant numbers to paid fetish videos.